Movie star…

Today I’ve a recipe from a movie for you. It’s simple, but awesome like most great things actually are. Especially in the cold season I like to come home to a hot chocolate.

In “Chocolat” everything is – you guessed right – about chocolate.

Chocolat_sheet

I know that some people have problems with chocolate. Yet, chocolate actually does not contain much histamine, but other biogenic amines like theobromine for exmaple (which can be lethal for cats in small amounts by the way) and therefore it is branded as a trigger or histamine liberator. Emulsifying agents like SOY lecithin are another problem 😉 Together with today’s recipe I will also let you know what my favourite chocolate brand is that manages without soy lecithin. I use this one when I don’t feel like making my own chocolate or when I just don’t have the time to do so. This post is not sponsored and I actually don’t intend to advertise here for products, yet, people are often curious what “histamine friendly” alternatives there might be. It took me some time to find a chocolate brand (without soy lecithin) that works.

Generally with chocolate and histamine the rule of the thumb applies that the lighter the better. Homemade, without soy, is always an option if you don’t want to miss out on chocolate.

This recipe comes in two versions, the original movie recipe and a histamine friendly alternative.

 

Hot dark chocolate with chili pepper and hot white chocolate (as histamine friendly alternative)


chocolat

That’s what the original looks like

chocolat1

And this is how it’s enjoyed

 

preparation time:

ca. 5-10 minutes

difficulty:

simple

ingredients for 2 cups (1 light, 1 dark):

2 1/2 pieces of white vanilla chocolate (Vivani) and 5 pieces of milk chocolate (Vivani, the bar is divided differently than the white one)

a little (about a tbsp.) whipped cream (self-made) – optional

ca. 300-400 ml milk

a pinch of chili pepper for the dark one

(a pinch of cinnamon) – optional

 

preparation:

Warm up milk on low fire in a pot, don’t bring it to boil though. Throw in the chocolate and slowly let it melt. Stir throughout the whole melting process, a little wire whip works great for that.

Meanwhile prepare the whipped cream with a little bit of homemade vanilla sugar.

When all the chocolate is melted, remove the pot from the stove and pour in the cups.

Add a pinch of chili pepper and stir carefully. Set a heaped tablespoon of whipped cream on top of every cup or push the whipped cream through an icing bag – that’s even prettier.

If you feel like watching a scene from the movie now where this chocolate appears, there you go. Armance drinks Vianne’s chocolate here for the first time and she is delighted in her own way about it 🙂

 

If you like to enjoy a histamine friendly hot white chocolate then go for white chocolate instead and omit the chili pepper. Use vanilla instead. Here we also went for both versions.

Enjoy!

 

(c) The Histamine Pirate

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Heart warming milk…

On the German version of this blog I post on every 6th of the month a DIY or recycling “recipe”. The post for the English blog is sometimes delayed, but today I’m right on time with this easy to do recipe.

It’s self-made coconut milk that will make you and your pets (if you have a cat or a dog) happy 🙂

 

Fast (warm) coconut milk from desiccated coconut

 

preparation time:

ca. 15 minutes

difficulty:

simple

ingredients for about 2 cups:

 

desiccated coconut/coconut flakes however much you like, depending on how “coconutly” your milk should taste

2 cups water

(coconut sugar or maple syrup – optional)

 

preparation:

Heat up water and desiccated coconut in a pot, but don’t cook it. Simmer for a couple of minutes and stir occasionally. Blend it. Press through a fine strainer (I used a tea strainer).

You can use the leftovers of the desiccated coconut for muffins or cakes.

If you like you can add vanilla or coconut sugar or alike to your milk.

I enjoyed it without any additional flavouring, yet, I used quite a bit of coconut flakes.

My biggest fan when it comes to coconut (flakes) is Shaolin. If prepared like I mentioned (without sugar or spices) she likes to lick the lukewarm milk.

For humans this is the right heart (and stomach) warming goodness in a cup for the upcoming cold season. So I’ll definitely prepare it again.

By the way I got the idea for this easy to prepare coconut milk from this how to video. Check it out.

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Enjoy!

 

(c) The Histamine Pirate

Yoghurt you can drink…

*** NOT low in histamine ***

It took me a while to decide whether to put this kind of recipes on the blog since it is actually concerned with histamine intolerance. I decided to do so, because sometimes you’ll also just want to cook for your beloved ones and because we are all different. A reader (I hate the word “follower” as if I’m some kind of leader) wrote me recently that she for instance is able to tolerate legumes (envy 😉 ). So depending on your individual degree of severity of your histamine intolerance you might also be able to eat small amounts of recipes from the “cooking for others” section.

To avoid confusion above these recipes you’ll always the note

*** NOT low in histamine ***

The headlines will be in blue (instead of usually purple).

To begin with this new section I give you a mango lassi recipe.

 

Mango lassi

 

preparation time:

ca. 10 minutes

difficulty:

normal

IMG_2443

ingredients for ca. 4 cups:

1 mango
1 cup of plain yoghurt (200g)
ca. 200 ml milk
pinch of vanilla sugar
pinch of cinnamon if you like

IMG_2441

 

preparation:

Peel the mango. Chop off the flesh around the pit and put it in a bowl. Add milk and yoghurt and add sweetness and spices to taste. Blend it all. If the lassi comes out too thick add a little more milk. If the day is extremely hot you might also go for some crushed ice to add to the mix.

 

Enjoy!

(c) The Histamine Pirate

 

 

Power drink…

Broccoli apple carrot juice

 

preparation time:

ca. 10 minutes

difficulty:

simple

IMG_1643 IMG_1644

ingredients for 2 glasses:

2 hands full of broccoli
1 apple
3 carrots
ca. 1/2 cup of water (100ml)

IMG_1640

preparation:

Clean the vegetables and fruit or peel it. Throw everything in the juicer. Then add 1/2 cup of water and stir it. Done.

Refreshing!

 

(c) The Histamine Pirate

Fitness drink…

Fitness drink with carrots

 

IMG_1236

preparation time:

10 minutes

difficulty:

simple

ingredients for 1 glass:

3 carrots
1 red bell pepper
ca. 50 ml water
1 tbsp. coconut oil

IMG_1235

preparation:

Clean the carrots and the bell pepper. Remove seeds from pepper. Chop it into large pieces and juice it with a juicer. Then add a little water and coconut oil, stir and enjoy.

(found similarly on eigene-naturprodukte.de)
 

Enjoy!


(c) The Histamine Pirate

Fresh and green…

Juice again! This time a quite refreshing one with cucumber. Perfect for summer and breakfast.

 

Apple carrot cucumber juice

 

preparation time:

ca. 15 minutes

 

difficulty:

simple

ingredients for 2 glasses:

1 large carrot
1 apple
1 piece of cucumber, about 10 cm long
ca. 1/2 cup of water (100 ml)

IMG_9956

preparation:

Clean veggies and fruits or peel them. Throw everything in the juicer. Then add half a cup of water (100ml), stir and enjoy.

IMG_9957IMG_9960

 

 

Refreshing!

(c) The Histamine Pirate

You can juice this…

Now I’ve finally started green juicing. Carrots and apples are already regulars at my “juice-merry-go-round”. Yet I never dared to try other veggies. But now here we go green juicing.

 

Apple fennel carrot zucchini juice

 

preparation time:

ca. 15 minutes

 

difficulty:

simple

IMG_8947

ingredients for 2 glasses:

1/2 zucchini
1 apple
2 carrots
handful of fennel
ca. 1/2 cup of water (100 ml)

 

IMG_8944

preparation:

Clean veggies and fruits or peel them. Throw everything in the juicer. Then add half a cup of water (100ml), stir and enjoy.

 

IMG_8946

 

Refreshing!

(c) The Histamine Pirate

I love this colour…

Instead of ice cream today we enjoyed milkshake to cool us a little. The pitiless heat of over 30°C persists. So drink a lot. But does it always have to be water? Today we opted for milkshake and that was refreshment and colour therapy in one, because it’s PURPLE.

Blueberry milkshake

 

preparation time:

ca. 5 minutes

 

difficulty:

simple

IMG_9088

ingredients for ca. 1 l:

IMG_9051

200g frozen blueberries
800 – 1000 ml milk, you can also use plant-based milk like oat or rice milk for the lactose free version
1/2 of a banana that’s still a little green (if you react to histamine very easily you can omit the banana)
4 tbsp. maple syrup (if you have a sweet tooth you can use more)
pinch of cardamom

IMG_8954IMG_9020

preparation:

Blend all the ingredients. (That’s it)

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tip: 

Depending on what you like and on what you can tolerate you can use different fruits. I can imagine that blackworries, gooseberries or currants would also work fine.

If you have friends or family over you can add 5 to 6 strawberries to the mix, but then it will not be so “histamine suitable” anymore. My “histamine bothered” boyfriend had the blueberry-banana-mix. I went for the plus-strawberries-version. To make that I stole some of the basic mix and added strawberries to blend it again.

IMG_9002

 

 

Feel refreshed!

(c) The Histamine Pirate

What about coffee, black tea …?

Tips

What about coffee, black tea …?

Reasons besides histamine intolerance why one might react to coffee, black tea, etc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

People with histamine intolerance often react to coffee and black tea. Sometimes they manage to tolerate green tea and even cacao.

But is there a general rule that goes for the whole coffee, tea, chocolate issue? Unfortunately, no. But there are some rules of the thumb one might want to consider and some tendencies one can work with.

Besides histamine intolerance one might want to consider if an additional coffee intolerance might be the problem if you cannot tolerate coffee at all.

Women suffering from PMS and people with blood type 0 often have problems with coffee.

Reasons why one might react to coffee, black tea, etc. when having histamine intolerance

Back on topic, caffeine generally blocks diaminoxidase (DAO). Many people therefore switch to grain coffee or carob coffee. This way one can still enjoy coffee, but without the typical effect that comes with caffeine.

Other people affected by histamine intolerance often try to fix the caffeine problem simply by drinking decaff. Indeed, this solves the caffeine problem, but I would not recommend it for other (health) reasons. First of all, the typical caffeine effect (wake up!) is absent here, too. Secondly, some chemicals involved in making decaff are considered carcinogens. Numerous procedures can be used to extract the coffeine from the beans. Usually the beans are therefore soaked in water, and then later treated with some chemical.

This chemical needs to be able to extract the caffeine, and only that, so the aroma remains. The first procedure known is the Roselius’ method, using the highly toxic substance benzene. Therefore, to my knowledge, it is not used anymore today. Another method includes the treatment of the beans with dichlormethane, a solvent that is suspected to be carcinogenic. Less harmful is the treatment with liquid nitrogen, which unfortunately is quite expensive.

Another alternative is called the Swiss Water Process. The problem with this method is that in the process of applying water and rinsing it through a carbon filter not only the caffeine is dissolved out the beans, but also some aromatic substances wash away. From a producer’s point of view, another drawback is that the extracted caffeine later on cannot be dried and sold otherwise, e. g. for energy drinks. So producers might turn to extracting caffeine by applying carbon dioxide.

A possible additional method is the treatment of the beans with triglycerides. The oil extracts the caffeine, yet leaves the aroma intact.

Especially organic coffee producers turn to the method applying dichlormethane or another method operating with ethyl acetate, a substance that can also be found in many fruits. The problem is we do not always know how the ethyl acetate was produced. Some coffee brands actually ferment sugar cane to get molasses with alcohol, and then add acetic acid. But others might take the shortcut through the labratory.

My problem with decaff is exactly that: How am I supposed to know which method was actually used to get the caffeine out? Due to this transparency issue I decided to leave the hands off decaff. You might handle this differently, though.

an espresso machine

If you still don’t want to deny yourself a coffee once in a while, I recommend you get yourself an espresso maker/machine. Machines for starters nowadays don’t have to be expensive and they will do a great job. I got myself an espresso machine some years ago for about 100 Euros. But please don’t spend your money on a machine using capsules, neither on a fully automated coffee machine. Capsules often contain chemicals. A fully automated coffee machine is expensive to maintain and almost impossible to really clean. Instead go for a real espresso machine – one where you have to plug the coffee in with a lever (like you can see in the picture).

Different from filter coffee, where the coffee powder soaks in water before it finally comes down into your pot as coffee, espresso is made with pressure (like the name suggests). The coffee powder does not soak in water, the water is pushed through the coffee powder instead. Due to this process espresso contains less bitters and less acid than filter coffee. The gut therefore does not acidify as easily. Furthermore, espresso contains less (!) caffeine than filter coffee. And it is caffeine which causes the histamine related reactions. You may tolerate coffee even better with milk (also plant based milk works). Don’t forget the mandatory glass of water that traditionally comes with any coffee you order in Italy. The coffee then is easier to digest and you won’t dehydrate as quickly. Just don’t drink too much coffee, because also espresso contains caffeine (just less) that blocks DAO.

Espresso consumed in a restaurant or cafe can sometimes lead to reactions, too. The level of hygiene is not the same everywhere. Espresso machines often don’t get cleaned as thoroughly or regularly as it would be necessary. The results are furred up conduits and mould. Therefore choose your barista wisely.

Black tea also contains caffeine, so black tea also blocks the DAO. The rule of the thumb here is, the longer the tea steepens the more bitter it will become and the more caffeine it will contain. Therefore don’t leave the tea bag or tee egg in too long. Ice tea that you can buy in bottles is usually made from black tea, too. So try to make your own ice tea, e.g. with rooibos tea.

Generally green tea is better tolerated than black tea, although it still contains caffeine. Yet, it is not fermented. Rooibos tea and black tea are both fermented. Rooibos tea just does not have caffeine. Most herbal teas can be consumed without worries (if you have any allergies you still want to bear in mind possible cross reactions, though).

Cocoa often leads to reactions, the same goes for chocolate. (Pure) cocoa also contains other biogenic amines. Cocoa is listed among the histamine and migraine triggers. In moderation some people can cope with it. I have a separate post regarding chocolate.

I hope I could shine a light on the whole coffee, black tea… issue. If you have questions or feedback feel free to email me at histaminarm[at]vollbio.de.

If you want to discuss the whole issue with other affected people, you can find links leading you to histamine groups on my links site.

(c) The Histamine Pirate